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Rosemary
Prostrate Rosemary
Yarrow
Italian Cypress
Boston Ivy
Small Cape Rush
Rosemary

Common name:Rosemary
Botanical name:Rosmarinus officinalis

Rosemary is hardy in full sun areas where winter temperatures do not drop below 10 degrees F. They can be grown in a clay pot with well-drained, porous soil in bright indoor light, and will also flourish on the backporch in spring, summer and fall. Its beautiful, slowly trailing stems and shiny slender leaves are perfect for showing off the small, light blue flowers that blossom in the summer.

Prostrate Rosemary

Common name:Prostrate Rosemary
Botanical name:Rosmarinus officinalis 'Prostratus'

The 'Prostratus' grows to a height of 2'-3' with a spread to 8'. Its flowers are pale, lavender blue in color; the leaves are needle-like with a dark, blue-green color. This plant makes a good ground cover, and its leaves can be used as seasoning in cooking.

Yarrow

Common name:Yarrow
Botanical name:Achillea millefolium

This Achillea features spreading mats of fern-like rosettes, along with deeply divided leaves of a green or gray green color. In this form, the flowers are usually a white tone. Stems can reach 2'-3' above foliage. Yarrows propagate easily from rooted cuttings or division, which should be performed in the early spring or fall. Following bloom, one should dead head the plant and divide the clumps when it appears crowded.

Italian Cypress

Common name:Italian Cypress
Botanical name:Cupressus sempervirens 'Stricta'

Italian Cypress is often associated with Italian and Spanish architecture, providing columns in the landscape. They often reach 60' tall. 'Stricta' is compact, columnar and produces long, straight branches with deep green foliage.

Boston Ivy

Common name:Boston Ivy
Botanical name:Parthenocissus tricuspidata

This deciduous vine grows leaves that are usually lobed and divided into 3 leaflets. It clings tightly to any surface.

Small Cape Rush

Common name:Small Cape Rush
Botanical name:Chondropetalum tectorum

Chondropetalum tectorum has 3'-4' tall stems that shoot out in all directions from the roots. Each stem has papery bracts connected to the ends that turn from tan to dark drown, then fall off. Chondropetalum can grow in marshes, in the ground with regular watering, or in drought conditions.

Using Water Wisely

An efficient watering system applies the right amount of water to the right parts of the garden at the right time. This conserves water and saves you money.

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Designer: Anon

Simple Gate

Photographer: GardenSoft

Soils and Compost:

Maintain a two to four inch layer of mulch on the soil surface to reduce weeds, infiltrate rain water, and reduce compaction.

Integrated Pest Management:

Develop healthy soil for plants that are vigorous and naturally pest-resistant.